Charlotte's Pics

From Chagall's dreamy figures to the impressive fluidity of the Laocoon sculpture, explore Studio Executive Charlotte Proctor Smith's top images and clips in the archive 

1.    What is your role at Bridgeman?

My role is Bridgeman Studio Executive, which means I spend the majority of my time working with the contemporary artists we represent at the library by signing up new artists, helping manage their accounts and promoting their work to our clients across the globe. Studio launched a year and a half ago and I have been working on it part time since its launch and full time now for the past 5 months.

 

2.    What do you love most about the job? 

I love that every day is a new and exciting challenge. I might spend one day visiting an artist studio or degree show on the hunt for new artists and images to sign up to the archive. Another day could also see me working directly with artists to either help them catalogue their work online or to find out about their latest exhibitions to promote through our Studio blog and social media platforms.

It is always busy but I love helping all the artists we represent get the most out of all the amazing services we offer at Bridgeman and discovering new artistic trends, which we will then go on to look out for in the new artists we sign up.

Working at Bridgeman is like working amongst family and friends, and this also transcends to the relationships I have been able to build with our contemporary artists, many of whom I have respected and followed for years.

 

3.    What misconceptions do clients most commonly have about the archive?

I think the main misconception that clients have is that they don’t realise how many young artists we represent, who are all right at the forefront of the creative scene and the start of their careers. Their work offers a fresh and exciting take on more traditional image licensing choices and many of them are also experienced in commissions and available to create original, bespoke images to fit a client’s brief though our Bridgeman Commission service. If you want a ‘one-of-a-kind’ image – look no further! 

 

Charlotte Proctor Smith, Bridgeman Studio Executive
Charlotte Proctor Smith, Bridgeman Studio Executive

 

Charlotte's favorite images and clips in the archive are...

 

Girl with a Kitten, 1947 (oil on canvas), Lucian Freud / Private Collection / © The Lucian Freud Archive / Bridgeman Images
Girl with a Kitten, 1947 (oil on canvas), Lucian Freud / Private Collection / © The Lucian Freud Archive / Bridgeman Images

 

 

1. Girl with a Kitten – Lucian Freud

I have always loved art – scribbling with coloured crayons and felt-tips as a child then discovering art and art history at school. I was a slightly odd teenager in that I would beg my parents to take me to museums and galleries at weekends and loved coming up to London and spending hours losing myself in the wonderful collections at The British Museum, The National Gallery and Tate.

But experiencing great art shouldn’t be a solitary thing. So when I went to meet my Dad after work and we decided to go to Tate Britain, it was a really special moment when we both found ourselves gravitating towards this wonderful painting by Lucian Freud. We both instinctively connected to the girl’s beautifully sad gaze and stood there looking at her and wondering what she was thinking in this ‘time-stopping’ moment that Freud manages to evoke.

That we both immediately went to the shop to buy a postcard, which we now have pinned up on our fridges, is really special and always reminds me of the power of great art to connect – all be it through your choice of fridge decoration!

 

2. Birthday – Marc Chagall

Marc Chagall is one of my absolute favourite artists. My love affair with his work, like many other people, probably started subconsciously after watching 'Notting Hill' on repeat, especially the scene where Julia Robert’s character explains why she loves his painting (and his flair for goats!). However it was at school that I first remember being struck by the beautifully dark and mystical narratives in his paintings.

The way the couple in this painting float and almost dance across the room is utterly surreal, dreamlike and romantic. I have a print of this work, which has followed me to every house I have lived in – I love it and could lose myself in Chagall’s whacky imagination for hours.

 

Birthday, 1915 (oil on cardboard), Marc Chagall / Museum of Modern Art, New York, USA / Bridgeman Images
Birthday, 1915 (oil on cardboard), Marc Chagall / Museum of Modern Art, New York, USA / Bridgeman Images

 

 

Laocoon, Hellenistic original, 1st century (marble), Greek / Vatican Museums and Galleries, Vatican City / Bridgeman Images
Laocoon, Hellenistic original, 1st century (marble), Greek / Vatican Museums and Galleries, Vatican City / Bridgeman Images

 

 

 

 

3. Laocoon Group

I studied Classics for my undergraduate degree, and one of my favourite subjects was Ancient Art and Archaeology. I remember going to the Vatican, having just finished a rather painful translation of the Aeneid, and seeing this sculpture ‘in the flesh’.

It brought this epic story completely to life – the movement and fluidity in the stone is breath taking. When you look at it you can feel your hair stand on end as you see the pain and struggle in Laocoon’s face as he and his sons struggle against the serpents sent by the god’s to punish them.

It is amazing to think such incredible craftsmanship existed thousands of years ago. I don’t think there are many sculptures since that could rival it.

 

4. Landscape with the Fall of Icarus – Pieter Bruegel the Elder

One of my favourite books is Michael Frayn’s ‘Headlong’. If you haven’t read it you must! It is all about a young would-be art historian who critics describe as a ‘Hugh Grant gone fat’, who believes he has discovered a missing Bruegel masterpiece. It is one of the funniest books I have ever read.

But if that isn’t recommendation enough, Frayn also opened my eyes to the fantastical world of Breugel’s paintings, describing inch by inch the narratives and symbolism in his work. This image was on the front cover on the book and I ended up spending just as much time looking at this image as I did reading the book itself.

 

Landscape with the Fall of Icarus, c.1555 (oil on canvas), Pieter Bruegel the Elder / Musees Royaux des Beaux-Arts de Belgique, Brussels, Belgium / Bridgeman Images
Landscape with the Fall of Icarus, c.1555 (oil on canvas), Pieter Bruegel the Elder / Musees Royaux des Beaux-Arts de Belgique, Brussels, Belgium / Bridgeman Images

 

 

Ben, Alessandro Raho / Private Collection / Bridgeman Images
Ben, Alessandro Raho / Private Collection / Bridgeman Images

 

 

 

 

5. Ben – Alessandro Raho

Alessandro Raho is one of the first artists I discovered through working with Bridgeman Studio and have since gone on to meet.

I love the clean and colourful nature of his work – they remind me of vacations, relaxation and escapism. His work is just effortlessly cool, like the artist himself!  I would love to have this painting of his on my wall.

 

 

 

6. Float – Charlotte Evans

Charlotte Evans is one of our newest Studio artists.  I adore her use of blues and greens and her soft, gentle style. Her work reminds me of the wonderful blue haze I woke up to every morning whilst travelling in Vietnam – a country I have fallen in love with and this painting in particular evokes a wonderful memory floating down the Mekong Delta, discovering the wonderful people, food, smells and colours of the Vietnamese floating markets.

 

Float, Charlotte Evans / Private Collection / Bridgeman Images
Float, Charlotte Evans / Private Collection / Bridgeman Images

 

 

L.S. Lowry: 'The Industrial Artist', 1972 / Bridgeman Footage
L.S. Lowry: 'The Industrial Artist', 1972 / Bridgeman Footage

 

 

7. L.S. Lowry: 'The Industrial Artist', 1972

This is a wonderful piece of footage. My father’s side of the family all come from North Yorkshire and we spent many family holidays exploring the canals and mills that still dominate the area.

Admittedly, most of the mills have now been turned into shops or plush apartments, but my grandfather, father and myself are all members of the Preston Mill’s Guild and Lowry, as a result, has always been the artist of choice for the family.

This film gives a fantastic insight into the way Lowry worked and also the industrial scenes that inspired him. It is a real treasure from our footage archive.

Bridgeman Studio: Find out More

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