Lucy's Pics

Bridgeman's manager of  Artists and Copyright, Lucy Innes Williams, talks about some of her favorite images in the archive. 

What is your role at Bridgeman?

My role at Bridgeman is to manage our contemporary artists and artists' estates, of which there are over 800 for full copyright administration and reproduction. I search for new artists who I think will license successfully, invite them to join our archive, catalog their work and then work to keep them at the forefront of our Sales Team’s and clients' imagination for licensing.

Additionally, I am managing our exciting new online platform Bridgeman Studio, launching this week for fine artists, illustrators and graphic artists. I am working alongside our dedicated Bridgeman Studio team and am thrilled about the new creative content and opportunities we’ve got in the pipeline.

 

What do you love most about the job?

I get really excited when an artist agrees to join. The process of encouraging an artist to sign up requires an understanding of their work, expectations and, most importantly, the ability to tailor their experience. When this aligns with successful licensing it’s a great combination!

When an artist realizes the potential of image licensing and Print on Demand as it runs alongside their original practice, it is often like watching a lightbulb go on - it’s such a fantastic way to promote your artwork and introduce it to an entirely new set of audiences. With our print-on-demand partner, Art.com, a Bridgeman artist's potential audience really is the whole world.
 

 

Bridgeman's manager of Contemporary Artists & Copyright: Lucy Innes Williams.
Bridgeman's manager of Contemporary Artists & Copyright: Lucy Innes Williams.

 

 

What misconceptions do clients most commonly have about the archive?

I think that clients are often surprised at just how close our relationship is to the artists we represent. Rather than keeping artists at arms' length, we talk to them regularly and give artists the opportunity to write their own rules with the archive. They all have a say in exactly how their work is licensed.

With the launch of Bridgeman Studio we have been lucky enough to receive crucial feedback from a number of our artists through all stages of development. We have a dedicated team specifically for Studio and so our interaction with artists in the next couple of months will increase even further with the introduction of commissioned artwork for clients. The proactive nature of the archive only serves to increase the level of collaboration and communication we share with our artists.
 

 

Lucy's favourite images in the archive are...

 

Seville Still Life, 1910 (oil on canvas), Henri  Matisse (1869-1954) / Hermitage, St. Petersburg, Russia
Seville Still Life, 1910 (oil on canvas), Henri Matisse (1869-1954) / Hermitage, St. Petersburg, Russia

 

 

1. Seville Still Life

This is an enduring image for me. It’s filled with beautiful textiles which inspired Henri Matisse throughout his life and continually inspires me. I always have a postcard of this in my house, and I’ve lost count of the number of times that my mother and I have sent this image to each other as a card. We never acknowledge that we’ve received the same card before, we just continue to send it to each other!

I can’t wait for the Matisse exhibition to open at Tate Modern in April. It’s the exhibition I’m most excited about for 2014 so far.

 

 

 

 

2. Duncan Grant textile

This image is a great example of the sheer variety of content that came out of both The Bloomsbury Group and The Omega Workshop during the first half of the 20th century. The bold color and repeated motifs are so versatile in their use across a wide range of licensing. I love the experimental nature of these patterns and textiles.

 

'Queen Mary' design for an Omega workshop fabric, 1937 (screenprinted cotton velvet), Duncan Grant (1885-1978) / Private Collection
'Queen Mary' design for an Omega workshop fabric, 1937 (screenprinted cotton velvet), Duncan Grant (1885-1978) / Private Collection

 

 

Hannah's Poppy, 2011 (watercolor), Rachel Pedder-Smith (Bridgeman Studio) / Private Collection
Hannah's Poppy, 2011 (watercolor), Rachel Pedder-Smith (Bridgeman Studio) / Private Collection

 


 

 

3. Rachel Pedder-Smith

Rachel is a fantastic Bridgeman Studio artist. Having spent time during her PhD studies in the Herbarium at Kew Gardens, the scientific detail in Rachel’s images is just mind-blowing. I can’t believe these are watercolors! Rachel groups together each seed, pod and flower with such beautiful precision and balance that her images work equally well as a set.

 

 

 

 

4. Red Deer

Peter Doig is one of my favourite living artists. I never tire of zooming in on the details in his work. The closer you get, the more you realise how abstract his mark-making gets. Even when the painting is strictly figurative, the abstract quality in the work’s detail creates an otherworldly, dreamlike feeling which, to me, is the enduring fascination of painting that you just don’t get in other art forms.

 

Red Deer, 1990 (oil on canvas), Peter Doig (b.1959) / Arts Council Collection, Southbank Centre, London, UK
Red Deer, 1990 (oil on canvas), Peter Doig (b.1959) / Arts Council Collection, Southbank Centre, London, UK

 

 

Container, 2014 (screenprint), Eliza Southwood (Contemporary Artist) / Private Collection
Container, 2014 (screenprint), Eliza Southwood (Contemporary Artist) / Private Collection

 

 

 

 

 

 

5. Eliza Southwood

Eliza Southwood is also one of our new Bridgeman Studio artists. Eliza works a lot with screen prints, which give such vibrancy to her art. She originally trained as an architect and this is evident in the precision and exactness of her lines. This image captures slightly faceless, urban infrastructure with a grainy texture which replicates the building’s materials and still shows the presence of the human hand in her work.

 

 

 

6. De Laszlo footage

This clip makes me smile each time I watch it! Seeing Philip de László set up his palette and easel to paint his model is a fascinating insight into the process of sketching, painting and working on an image - made more interesting by the presence of a live model! It’s a case of constantly reassessing and running through the creative process from A-Z again and again.

 

Philip de László paints a model from Lucile fashion house / The Bridgeman Art Library
Philip de László paints a model from Lucile fashion house / The Bridgeman Art Library

 

 

Bridgeman Studio: find out more

Searching for the best contemporary talent? Then look no further than Bridgeman Studio, our new online platform for contemporary artists providing the most creative content for image licensing from talented artists, illustrators and graphic artists around the world. Visit the Bridgeman Studio website or follow on Twitter and Tumblr.


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